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Welcome to Rose McIver Online, an exclusive and in-depth fansite for the talented actress Rose McIver. Serving fans since 2009, we are the longest running and most extensive fansite dedicated to Rose.

Rose is known for her roles in projects such as "Once Upon a Time", "Maddigan's Quest" and "Power Rangers R.P.M", and can currently be seen in the CW television show "iZombie" as the lead character Olivia 'Liv' Moore.

We aim to bring you all the latest news and images relating to Rose's acting career, and strive to remain 100% gossip-and-paparazzi-free. - Sara, Neide & Emily
Archive for the ‘Interviews’ Category
Sara   /   Mar 29,2016   /   0 Comments

Feasting on brains hardly seems like leading lady fare, but Rose McIver is more than eager to dig in. In fact, the 27-year-old actress relishes her monstrous starring on role iZombie (a hit TV series in its second season on CW, based on the cult Vertigo/DC comic book of the same name). That’s because it allows her to delve into the minutia of being undead—from hiding her zombie affliction like a secret identity to turning cerebral cortexes into appetizing snacks to contending with colleagues who mistake her postmortem paleness and chilly demeanor as an “emo-goth” act.

During a recent phone interview, the New Zealand-born actress dropped her convincing onscreen American accent, letting her charming Kiwi lilt shine through while explaining the series’ unique take on the well-trodden zombie genre: “We wanted to have a little bit of the gore and psychological stuff, but we also wanted to have a laugh about it and be self-aware.”

Several of those humorous elements have made iZombie a hit with critics and audiences—be it the apt naming of McIver’s character, Liv, or how the character watches Night of the Living Dead to research her affliction. The former owners of the brains she devours aren’t Liv’s prey, per se. Instead, they are murder victims for whom she seeks justice—while also keeping her supernatural cravings at bay—by nibbling on their neural pathways in the morgue (where she works) and, in turn, absorbing memories about their killings. Temporarily succumbing to those victims’ whims—like the kleptomania of the woman she tries to avenge in the pilot—is a side effect that is unfortunate for Liv, but entertaining for the audience.

Taking on those new characteristics from episode to episode is one of the challenges that keeps McIver so engaged with the role. However, she says, the difficulties lying in that task are different than one might expect. For instance, Liv isn’t completely transformed into the person whose brain she eats, meaning McIver isn’t playing a new character in each episode.

“I think part of the challenge is maintaining Liv each week, and her integrity,” McIver says. “So I try to find different ways to incorporate the characteristics of each person whose brain is eaten by Liv, but still have the audience invested in Liv as a character.”

Striking that balance sometimes requires McIver to draw on other talents. In one such episode, Liv began spinning expert pirouettes after devouring a ballerina’s brain, a plotline that the writers developed upon learning about the actress’ dance studies as a girl back in Auckland. But sometimes the learning curve on iZombie is far steeper, requiring McIver to study up on casino jargon when Liv gobbled up the mind of a gambling addict, or to spend time researching with one of the Real Housewives after her character ate the brains of an uppity lady who behaved like a reality TV star.

But one of the funnest—and strangest—skills she has learned is how to stomach the ugly, squiggly fake cerebellum that the scripts call for her to chomp on. For McIver, accomplishing that feat was mind over matter in every sense of the word. “It’s often made from clumps of gelatine, bits of corn syrup, and vegetable juice,” she said of the phony brains made for the series, adding: “During my last episode, the crew made a concoction of bread crumbs and mushrooms—with bits of fake brain in the mix, of course. It was actually pretty delicious. After we finished the shoot I kept eating it, which everyone found to be pretty hilarious.”

[Note: This article first appeared in Under the Radar’s Best of 2015 print issue, which is still on newsstands now. This is its debut online.]

(iZombie airs Tuesdays at 9/8 Central on the CW.)

Feasting on brains hardly seems like leading lady fare, but Rose McIver is more than eager to dig in. In fact, the 27-year-old actress relishes her monstrous starring on role iZombie (a hit TV series in its second season on CW, based on the cult Vertigo/DC comic book of the same name). That’s because it allows her to delve into the minutia of being undead—from hiding her zombie affliction like a secret identity to turning cerebral cortexes into appetizing snacks to contending with colleagues who mistake her postmortem paleness and chilly demeanor as an “emo-goth” act.

During a recent phone interview, the New Zealand-born actress dropped her convincing onscreen American accent, letting her charming Kiwi lilt shine through while explaining the series’ unique take on the well-trodden zombie genre: “We wanted to have a little bit of the gore and psychological stuff, but we also wanted to have a laugh about it and be self-aware.”

Several of those humorous elements have made iZombie a hit with critics and audiences—be it the apt naming of McIver’s character, Liv, or how the character watches Night of the Living Dead to research her affliction. The former owners of the brains she devours aren’t Liv’s prey, per se. Instead, they are murder victims for whom she seeks justice—while also keeping her supernatural cravings at bay—by nibbling on their neural pathways in the morgue (where she works) and, in turn, absorbing memories about their killings. Temporarily succumbing to those victims’ whims—like the kleptomania of the woman she tries to avenge in the pilot—is a side effect that is unfortunate for Liv, but entertaining for the audience.

Taking on those new characteristics from episode to episode is one of the challenges that keeps McIver so engaged with the role. However, she says, the difficulties lying in that task are different than one might expect. For instance, Liv isn’t completely transformed into the person whose brain she eats, meaning McIver isn’t playing a new character in each episode.

“I think part of the challenge is maintaining Liv each week, and her integrity,” McIver says. “So I try to find different ways to incorporate the characteristics of each person whose brain is eaten by Liv, but still have the audience invested in Liv as a character.”

Striking that balance sometimes requires McIver to draw on other talents. In one such episode, Liv began spinning expert pirouettes after devouring a ballerina’s brain, a plotline that the writers developed upon learning about the actress’ dance studies as a girl back in Auckland. But sometimes the learning curve on iZombie is far steeper, requiring McIver to study up on casino jargon when Liv gobbled up the mind of a gambling addict, or to spend time researching with one of the Real Housewives after her character ate the brains of an uppity lady who behaved like a reality TV star.

But one of the funnest—and strangest—skills she has learned is how to stomach the ugly, squiggly fake cerebellum that the scripts call for her to chomp on. For McIver, accomplishing that feat was mind over matter in every sense of the word. “It’s often made from clumps of gelatine, bits of corn syrup, and vegetable juice,” she said of the phony brains made for the series, adding: “During my last episode, the crew made a concoction of bread crumbs and mushrooms—with bits of fake brain in the mix, of course. It was actually pretty delicious. After we finished the shoot I kept eating it, which everyone found to be pretty hilarious.”

[Note: This article first appeared in Under the Radar’s Best of 2015 print issue, which is still on newsstands now. This is its debut online.]

(iZombie airs Tuesdays at 9/8 Central on the CW.) (Source)

Sara   /   Dec 01,2015   /   0 Comments

Eric Goldman for ING recently did a short interview with Rose during a visit at the iZombie set, which you can now read below. For the trivia interested, the couple she is talking about in the interview is Olivia Tennet and Milo Cawthorne, both good friends of her, as well as “Power Rangers R.P.M” co-stars. She actually attended their wedding a few years ago, and a photo can be found here! All three of them also starred in “Maddigan’s Quest” back in 2006…

These days she’s eating brains on the CW’s highly entertaining iZombie, but before her role on that series, and shows like Once Upon a Time and Masters of Sex, Rose McIver was fighting bad guys as the Yellow Ranger on Power Rangers RPM.

On a recent visit to the set of iZombie, I briefly asked McIver if she had any advice for the cast of the upcoming Power Rangers movie and spoke to her about the notably successful cast of RPM, which also starred Eka Darville (Jessica Jones) and Adelaide Kane (Reign).

IGN: They are making this new Power Rangers movie, which is getting a lot of attention. Do you have any advice to these new Power Rangers, having been a Ranger yourself?

McIver: Oh my goodness, that was probably one of the funnest eight months stints of my life. We just laughed our heads off; we had so much fun. I think, make sure you enjoy it. Don’t take yourselves too seriously. You’re fighting monsters in rubber suits. But it’s a blast! It’s so cool and it’s so cool to be a part of something that as a child my peers watched and I look now and there are children watching it still. It sort of transcends one particular generation and that’s so fun to be part of, so enjoy every minute.

IGN: I spoke to Eka Darville recently about Jessica Jones and you’ve got Adelaide [Kane] on Reign. Your cast seems to be doing very well! What was the alchemy on that?

Rose McIver: We all just felt like such a good group of friends. I actually saw recently that Eka had gone on a road trip with Ari Boyland, who played the Blue Ranger. They are still great friends. I think there’s been a lot of personal and professional crossover. A couple of them got married! Two of my very dear friends got married from that show so it was a very special kind of time in everybody’s lives. [Proceed to full article + a funny Power Rangers video]

Sara   /   Nov 18,2015   /   0 Comments

Los Angeles Confidential has posted a new interview with Rose! We’ve included it below for you all to read. We also added a new outtake from a Luc-Richard Elie photographed photoshoot from earlier this year, which was attached with the interview, to our photo gallery. You can find it here.

[Source] We caught up with New Zealand actress Rose McIver to chat about the second season of her hit show iZombie, how her character Liv maintains her perfectly pale complexion, and why she hates eating fake zombie brains.

From Night of the Living Dead to the Walking Dead, zombie depictions in television and film have come a long way. Rather than being bloodthirsty or even trying to overrun the world, Rose McIver’s character Liv Moore in iZombie—from Veronica Mars creator Rob Thomas and loosely based on the Vertigo comic bookis a crime solver whose characteristics skew more human than monster.

Liv became a zombie after being bitten at a party, and now, she must find brains to eat in order to remain undead. Naturally she goes where brains are in excess—a police morgue. The twist? She takes on the personalities and memories of the people whose brains’ she eats, helping detectives solve their murders.

We rang McIver to talk about Liv’s beauty secrets, how a zombie finds love, and what those brains really taste like.

The new season of your show iZombie premiered in October. What can we expect from your character Liv during the rest of the season?
ROSE MCIVER: Liv finds herself dealing with some serious villains this season and Blaine is actually the least of her concerns. We get introduced to a couple of baddies very soon. With a couple more players knowing she is a zombie she has more support than she felt in season one.

Rob Thomas also worked on Veronica Mars. Are you a fan of the show?
RM: I am! Kristen Bell is so wonderful. I actually knew quite a few people who worked on that show who had such a great time making it that I knew coming on to iZombie would be one of the best experiences I could ever ask for.

Your character eats a lot of brains to satisfy her cravings, which means you have to take on the mannerisms of various types of people. Is there a trope you’ve enjoyed playing the most?
RM: I enjoy them all for different reasons. The variety is what is such a blast to play. I really love the magician, who I channel in a couple episodes’ time.

Can you talk a little bit about the romance on the show? How exactly does a zombie find love?
RM: It’s certainly not easy. Liv is still human enough to want to be loved and to be complex and have needs, but the nature of her changing temperament makes it so hard to be consistent. Move over PMS, this knocks it out of the park. She is lucky that Major, who adores her, has incredible patience. But he has limits too.

Liv has some pretty great white-blonde locks and a super porcelain complexion. Any insight you can offer up on her beauty routine?
RM: Sunscreen and hats. I have to be very sun-smart. Luckily growing up in New Zealand where there is a hole in the ozone layer, I was already very careful. The hair is a wig! So for me it’s just about trying to find enough time to sleep and taking care of my skin. Amber Trudeau, our makeup designer, does a fantastic job of finding the balance between zombie and pretty.

One last question, do you actually enjoy eating those fake brains when shooting?
RM: No way. Gelatin and vegetable juice and hot sauce. Yuck! But it’s a tiny, tiny price to pay. I am so lucky I get to do this job.

Sara   /   Oct 06,2015   /   0 Comments

Yet another update! Rose did an interview with Access Hollywood a few hours ago, and we’ve added screen captures to our gallery (thank to my friend at Sean Maguire Daily for help with the video). Watch the interview below! She looks so beautiful… We also added caps from the KTLA appearance from this morning.

Sara   /   Oct 06,2015   /   0 Comments

[ INTERVIEW SOURCE ] I received a phone call from Rose McIver not five minutes after watching the season six premiere of The Walking Dead. I have to say, after an hour and a half of Walking Dead‘s dreary, hopeless brand of zombie storytelling, Ms. McIver – her New Zealand accent thick, her attitude unwaveringly chipper – was something of a breath of fresh air.

The same could be said, really, for iZombie, from Veronica Mars creator Rob Thomas and adapted from the Vertigo comic bookIn the middle of a zombie boom period with no shortage of blood, guts, and gore, the CW’s resident zombie series premiered earlier this year, offering viewers a far more lighthearted take on the undead aesthetic. Ms. McIver stars as Liv Moore, who leaves her job as a medical intern to work in a morgue after contracting the zombie virus. You know, to be close to the brains. Which she eats. Luckily, Liv also gains the memories and character traits of the brains’ owners, information she uses to help solve crimes.

I know, I know, what a premise. But the show gained confidence in its odd-ball story straight out of the gate. It also gained an audience. iZombie‘s second season begins tonight, so I chatted with Ms. McIver about what to expect, Liv teaming up David Anders’ Blaine and, most importantly, if anyone has managed to make those brains taste any better.

I just finished Walking Dead, so I apologize if I mess up my zombie lore at all.

Ahh, we are big fans of The Walking Dead. That’s kind of a different zombie show, I’d say. They’ve got the apocalyptic thing down.

If Walking Dead does the apocalypse, where does iZombie fit now in the grand scheme of zombie fandom? 

We’re the self-aware zombie show! iZombie actually recognizes zombies as a part of pop culture. Liv does her research by watching the old, black-and-white zombie films. I think the reflective things in our show really sets it apart, and we are able to handle it with some wry humor.

So where do we find Liv at the beginning of Season 2?

We catch up with her in many ways. Very isolated, and feeling frustrated that, through no fault of her own, many of the people closest to her in her life have pushed her away. She’s on the rocks in her relationship with Major, Peyton has run away because she simply can’t cope with Liv being a zombie. Clive and Ravi are really the only ones that can stick by her, and Clive doesn’t even know she’s a zombie.

Rob Thomas said there’s a good chance that Liv and Blaine work together in season 2. Anything you can tell me about that?

Last season, David Anders and I were so frustrated that we didn’t get to work together more, because naturally our storylines kept as at arms length. But we have such great on-screen chemistry. It will be this dynamic resistance between these two characters, but a shared understanding because they have both gone through something that pretty much no one else has. It’s a lot of fun to be had, there’s a lot of humor in exploring that new rapport they have in working together. At the same time he has killed people very dear to Liv, which is something not easily overlooked. It’s a dynamic shitft, and it’s interesting.

What kind of brains are we looking at in season 2? I think Rob Thomas mentioned an “old man brain?”

Yeah, we actually kick off with a grumpy old man brain, which was actually one of my least favorite characters to play. He’s kind of a bigoted character. It works very well for the story but it’s hard to play a character for me that I can’t really find anything I like about them. I love Liv, and I love many of the aspects of the brains she’s eaten, but this character is a bigoted, pretty racist Archy Bunker type of old guy. It’s not a very appealing character to dip in to.

That’s what we start with, then I think I’m allowed to tell you the next couple – a frat boy, a ‘real housewife,’ and a country music singer. Those are kind of one through four, and it’s a really good range. That’s something we played with a little more this season – how much the brains influence Liv’s personality.

I assume you get to sing a bit for the country music singer. 

I’ve always sung, so it’s nice to get an opportunity to show that a little bit on the show with this character. That’s kind of what I love so much about this show, how these hobbies I’ve picked up over the years are finding new life on screen with this character. I’ve been pushing [the writers] toward things I’ve done like…I used to figure skate, or I did a bit of ballet. I really enjoy singing, I think it’s the most exposing thing we can do.

So with an entire season in the books and headed into season two, have they found any way to make the brains taste better for you?  

Well, they’re not good [laughs]. It’s mostly gelatin, so it’s really what they mix it with to disguise it. I just ate, last week, it was actually tiny little bits of gelatin in with mushrooms, and breaded tofu and all sorts of things. It was really delicious! That was the best version. It was the first time I’ve ever eaten a brain on set and been like ‘Hey, this isn’t bad.’ The week before we did a stew that was just appalling. It was like brain mixed in with packet stew sauce, this thick kind of brown gravy. That was pretty awful.

iZombie’s second season starts October 6 at 9 PM on The CW. 

Sara   /   Oct 06,2015   /   0 Comments

[Interview Source]Season 2 of the CW’s “iZombie” returns tonight, and with it, a whole set of new personalities for Rose McIver.

Liv Moore is just your average young professional, trying to balance family, work and romance in the big city. Well, average in the sense that she’s also a zombie who can solve crimes by gaining the memories and skills of murder victims whose brains she dines on. But that’s just the world of “iZombie,” which begins its second season tonight. Last season saw Liv (Rose McIver) getting ever closer to the mystery of how she became a zombie — in a modern twist, it seems to involve a bad batch of a party drug getting mixed with an energy drink called Max Rager. Despite those gains, she also struggled with how and to whom to disclose her condition among her family and friends, and butted heads with a fellow zombie named Blaine (David Anders of “Alias”) whose zombie instincts were just a little less altruistic than Liv’s. Here’s what McIver has to say about where Season 2 is going.

Where do things stand with Liv at the start of Season 2?

I think in some ways, she’s in a similar predicament to the start of Season 1. Liv, through no means of her own, has managed to isolate herself and push away the people that she loves and so she’s pretty alone. The great thing is, starting with Season 2, she already has the companionship of [colleague and zombie cure researcher] Ravi. And almost like a therapist or something, he’s able to kind of talk her off the ledge, with things that would almost ruin anybody.

Will she and Ravi still be working hard on finding a cure for being a zombie?

They certainly will! Liv is tired of eating gelatin.

Does she feel any ambivalence about getting cured, since she’s doing important work as a zombie?

Absolutely. That’s actually something that’s very much discussed. But I think it’s tough, because it’s given her a newfound purpose and it’s wonderful that she’s able to contribute to society in a fantastic way, but it still means that she can’t have kids. It means that she seemingly cannot be with the love of her life. It means that she gets these traumatic visions all of the time. It’s a sense of obligation in many ways as well and she’s always be an altruistic person so it’s hard to know whether she needs this the same way.

What personas or skills will we see Liv take on this season?

In the first episode, I’m a grumpy old man, so I don’t get any skills, but I get a lot of Archie Bunker style opinions. In the second episode, I get a frat boy’s brain and so you should have seen me and the four boys on set, they were just loving it, they were in their element. They were like, ah, this all makes sense. The third episode is a real housewife, and that’s really fun because we actually get a bit of a physical transformation there too, which is kind of the first time Liv’s done that. And then the fourth episode is a country music singer, so I get to pick up the guitar and we have a lot of fun with that one too.

Last season, Liv dated a fellow zombie. Will we see her bond with any other zombies this year?

In some ways, this season because there’s a super villain of Max Rager and what’s going on there, she ends up having to team up with the person she would never want to — that’s Blaine. And obviously he killed her boyfriend. It’s a difficult hurdle to overcome as friends and I don’t think friends is in the cards at the moment but she definitely is aware that for the greater good of mankind and zombiekind, they need to work together. So you see some really interesting interactions between those two, and kind of a sense of two zombies chatting about things and having companionship in each other in some ways. It’s a very fraught and tense friendship, but it’s an interesting one.

Last season, Blaine got one of the two existing doses of the zombie cure. How’s he adjusting to his new life?

Blaine is, he makes situations work for him. He’s an opportunist. He’s not struggling as much as anyone else would, given what he’s gone through. There’s pros and cons for him, but we see definitely some of the pros very early on.

Someone who’s that adaptable is also good as an ally, right?

Yeah! Although I wouldn’t trust him as far as I can kick him.

Will [series creator] Rob Thomas ever have you use your real New Zealand accent?

We’ve talked about it. There’s a couple of cool ideas about how that could work. We will see if the people we would require can come together.

There are so many great Kiwi actors out there, but they never get to use their real accents.

Yeah, that’s the thing. We’ve gone out to a few people seeing if there’s any world in which that could work. A lot of my friends live out in the States. We’ll see!

I’m hoping for a giant Flight of the Conchords crossover.

You’re not too far off!

Sara   /   Oct 04,2015   /   0 Comments

[Article Source] It’s all or nothing for Kiwi actress Rose McIver, who’s setting out to leave her mark on the world.

She’s worked on a host of Kiwi productions, from Shortland Street to Legend of the Seeker to Peter Jackson’s The Lovely Bones.

Now though, she’s now best known for playing brain-eating crime-solver Liv Moore on US television show iZombie.

This sees her living full time in LA, and while she talks fondly about missing New Zealand, she’s calling California home.

“I miss the seasons. That with the way the sky changes you’re able to start anew. It gives you some markers in the year and without that it’s kind of strange, it’s one really long, hot day,” she says.

“And I would love to do projects back home, but really I just want to work on something that I adore and wherever that takes me is where I’ll go.”

Where that’s taken her now is into sci-fi/horror territory.

Her character is a zombie who has to eat brains to stay alive. She takes on the memories and character traits of whoever’s brain it was, and uses the insight to solve crime.

Yet she says being a zombie is the least important part of the show.

“We call it a zom-com-rom-drama,” McIver laughs.
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“Liv’s just a girl who’s had a really painful relationship break-up and change of career path and is still trying to work out her own identity. She’s in her mid-20s, and I look around at myself and a lot of my friends who have experienced a lot of these things where you’ve just got to assess your connections with people and what you’re doing with your life and your meaning.”

But McIver’s selling herself short. She’s been living in LA for five years and is now on a show which gives her stability and steady work for the foreseeable future – something she says is a luxury in the entertainment business.

“It’s great to be able to build a character that you know and can stay with for a couple of years, that’s really fantastic and you develop great relationships with people you work with and you’re able to play more as an actor, I think,” she says.

That said, she’s not ruling out any more film or theatre work or even moving back home, it’s all just a matter of finding the right project.

“I don’t want to ever be somewhere wishing I was somewhere else, so while I’m here this is home, but I’m very open to seeing what the next few years brings.”

iZombie season two is fast tracked to TVNZ On Demand from October 6.

Sara   /   Sep 25,2015   /   0 Comments

Q&A:  iZombie star Rose McIver  talks to Michael Idato

OK, so let’s cut to the chase. You’re playing Liv Moore, a zombie who works in the morgue so she has access to a steady diet of human brains. What are you actually eating in those scenes?

It’s gelatin. I pushed for human brains. I said guys, I’m with it, give me what you’ve got. They said no.  It’s pretty disgusting. Gelatin covered in corn syrup is never going to be good. That said, it could be worse. It’s fine.

The series is a hit, and part of a bigger genre of zombie shows such as The Walking Dead and Z Nation. What happens when you wake up and realise you’ve been turned into an action figure?

I honestly am so excited. I haven’t seen in it in the flesh yet, but Rahul and Malcolm [Rahul Kohli, who plays Dr Ravi Chakrabarti and Malcolm Goodwin, who plays detective Clive Babineaux] went and took photos. They said there’s interchangeable hands and heads. So cool. It’s great. It’s very, very flattering.

Part of the series’ premise is that Liv acquires a range of things via the brains she eats, personality quirks, flashes of memory or even acquired skills. How is that to play?

You know each time Liv eats a brain she takes on these things, these characteristics and skills, that could be funny or they can be compromising. But I think that knowing the relationship that she has with the other characters, and the overarching themes and storylines, I can’t imagine it not being grounded. I can’t imagine not investing in that and not feeling like there’s huge stakes for Liv. For me it’s like when you’re at a funeral and you have an urge to laugh. Often when people do, it brings out the most silly, or distracted, or heightened versions of yourself. But the actual experience of going through it is still very loaded, and grounded, and filled with kind of grit.
What do you enjoy most about the role?

I love the variety. In the flashback sequences when we see her, things were too easy. It was all going in one direction. It was all very smooth. She was in love and had a great job and everything. I think this has been the best thing for her. It’s really shaken her up. Obviously it’s been very compromising in many senses, but she’s found new parts to herself. She’s become a lot more interesting, and complex, and courageous. I think it’s been a real character-building experience.

What about her relationship with her family?

She’s put people in difficult situations, she’s been put in difficult situations, and I think there’s going to be a lot to struggle with forgiveness, and being able to be connected, and genuine, and intimate with her family, because a secret like that is – I don’t know, a terrible secret to keep – it would suck. I don’t like it. I like being able to be open and honest with the people that I love and I definitely tried to bring that to them as well. That’s a painful thing to have to pull from people.
It is tough for her blending in, so to speak, because she looks so different. The show’s zombies aren’t like other show’s zombies, but her pallid complexion is so different.

I actually love that Liv just acknowledges that she looks different. She’s not the same. It’s so fun for me to book a show that is on a network that has a lot of really beautiful women that look a certain way [in the US the show airs on The CW, which has a young-skewing audience and a program slate tailored to that demographic] and they have approved and been so supportive of this character who just embraces who she is. She looks different and that’s great. And I think that confidence gives her a lot of beauty. I hope she just owns it.

Sara   /   May 21,2015   /   0 Comments

iZombie fans are still reeling from the death of Liv’s boyfriend, so naturally, TVLine asked Rose McIver the one question on everyone’s mind: Is Lowell’s tasty noggin going to end up in her next salad?

“I actually thought about that,” McIver admitted with a laugh on the red carpet at The CW’s upfront presentation. “It’s kind of like reading someone’s diary, and there’s nothing to be gained from that right now. Liv is also grieving him independently. That’s an interesting question, and I’m not sure there’s a black-and-white answer.”

One thing that is black-and-white, however, is Liv’s clear mission in the wake of Lowell’s murder: Stop Blaine at all costs!

“The one good thing about [losing Lowell] is, because Blaine has taken away somebody that Liv loves, it’s given her so much passion and resolve not to let him get away with anything anymore.”

buckley-faceAs for Major — you know, the guy who remains ridiculously good-looking, despite having half of his face mangled in a gang fight — McIver says we can expect some major (teehee!) developments from his investigation in the coming weeks.

“He’s getting closer and closer to finding out about zombies and what they are and what Liv’s role in it all is,” she teases. “In the next couple of episodes, there are some pretty huge reveals.” – Article from TV Line

Sara   /   May 10,2015   /   0 Comments

There are so many different takes on zombies today. What sets the iZombie story apart from others?
I feel like iZombie is a world that acknowledges that zombies exist in pop culture. And it looks at the trajectory of zombie movies like Night of the Living Dead and 28 Days Later and acknowledges them in a way I think we haven’t seen before. So it lends itself to being a lot of fun and lighthearted.

You’re in a zombie apocalypse and you have to leave your house right away. What article of clothing do you grab first?
A bike helmet. I would rather be running in my thermals with a bike helmet than anything else, because that’s what zombies are going to be going for, so it’s for protection.

Liv solves homicide cases by inheriting memories. If you could solve any real-life case or mystery, which would it be and why?
Well I think in moral terms it would be nice to get inside a missing person’s case, but for pure sensationalist curiosity, I think it would be really interesting to know what happened with Marilyn Monroe.

Liv has a signature beauty look (pale skin, dark eyes). What’s your go-to look in real life?
I think good skin is always appealing, so actually a skincare regime would be my go-to favorite thing, like a nice moisturizer. I’ve been loving Kate Somerville lately. I think it’s nice to see people’s real beauty and who they are. In my own life, when it’s not for photo shoots or anything else, I think it’s nice to have quite a minimal look.

What has been the most exciting part of joining the cast of Masters of Sex?
Allison Janney—I’m a huge fan of hers. I think she is so endearing and smart and beautiful and surprising as an actor. You know, she makes really great choices. Whenever I work with her, I feel very inspired, and it’s a good reminder of the ability for it to be a creative process.

The show takes place in the ’50s. Are you inspired at all by the fashion of that era?
Very much so. My body type in general doesn’t lend itself to model-ish clothes and big baggy T-shirts and things like that. I tend to look a lot better with tapered waists and very feminine designs, so working on a show based in the 1950s is just a godsend for that reason.

You were a Power Ranger at one point! What was the best part about playing the Yellow Ranger?
Well it’s safe to say that I wasn’t inspired by the fashion of the Power Rangers; I was very ready to see the death of my yellow spandex suit. But the best part was it had a large stunt component. That was really great to develop a strong understanding of martial arts and being able to keep on top of that physical acting ability. But also, just working with friends. It shot in New Zealand about a half an hour away from where I lived, and I was working with people, a lot of whom I had know since I was 12, so it was a great group of people and very fun.

Describe your personal style in three words.
Feminine. Practical. Fresh.

What are some of your favorite places to shop (in the U.S. and New Zealand)?
In New Zealand, my favorites are Juliette Hogan and RUBY. I absolutely love their lines; they have brilliant stuff. In terms of out here… I mean, all sorts. I walked into Barneys the other day, and that’s a dangerous place for me to be. I like little boutiques as well, like Mohawk General Store in Silver Lake, and there’s another one called Bucks & Does. Both carry a great range of designers and some braver choices that I wouldn’t necessarily make walking around a department store.

Is there a piece you are wearing over and over right now?

Yes, a red playsuit from RUBY, which is the New Zealand label I was talking about. It’s great, because in L.A. it’s supposed to be spring, but it’s 86 degrees today, so I am very happy that the piece is light and almost like you are wearing nothing at all. It’s great for those long freeway drives in the heat.

What’s your favorite weekend escape?

I really like Point Mugu, which is north of Malibu. There’s a little campsite up there that my friends and I discovered a couple of years ago, and we were actually back there last weekend camping. It’s really cute. It’s quaint, right next to the water, and only an hour and a half outside the city, so you can’t justify it being too far. I really like spending time at the beach. I grew up near the water at home, and it feels very good for me.

I read that you write from time to time. What do you like to write?

My long-term goal is I would love to write a novel. I am an avid reader myself of fiction, and that’s something I’d really like to do. I’ve written a film called Crystal that we’re hoping to make within the next couple of years. It’s something that I would just be acting as a writer and a producer on. I am not going to be in it, and I think that was a wise decision for the first script, to write something where there is no agenda for you or how you want to portray yourself or a character that is particularly fascinating for me to play, but just characters that I’m interested in and empathize with, and just working on developing those.

In terms of writing a novel, what kind of genres are you interested in?

Well, I love people like Jonathan Franzen and Wally Lamb and Donna Hart; those are some examples of novelists that currently inspire me. And Margaret Atwood. Just contemporary authors who write and understand the human condition and write with a lot of empathy. I really like that Wally Lamb is fascinated by women’s penitentiaries. He works a lot with the New York correctional institute and the female prisoners and gets them to tell their stories and curates and edits these amazing pieces. I just think empathetic stories where we understand people’s transgressions and backstories and who people are and where they come from and why they make the decisions they do, that’s something that really interests me.

What are you currently reading?
I just finished a book called The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan that is this really harrowing, fascinating story about Australian POWs working in the Japanese empire building the railway train to Burma. It’s just an amazing, very textured story of these two men from other sides of the world trying to be good people but making bad decisions at times. Again, it’s all about empathy and why people make these silly, horrific choices in life but believe they are doing the right thing. I absolutely loved it, but it’s very dark, so I’m actually on the lookout for something that is a little lighter, just something really funny. I do like to read funny novels. I remember this guy, Mil Millington, who writes really funny novels, so I’m going to have to find one of his.

You’ve played a wide range of characters in your career. Is there something you haven’t done yet that you would like to?
Yes, I would like to play a villain. I’ve never played a true villain. That’s something I’m actually looking at for a couple of [projects] right now, so it’s very much on the horizon.

Do you have a favorite villain?
Javier Bardem was pretty good in [Skyfall]. And people like Tilda Swinton are wonderful; she does that very, very well.

What is your TV guilty pleasure?
You know what, I tuned in to one of the most shocking, ridiculous reality shows I’ve ever heard of—it’s almost like a car accident I couldn’t look away from—called Bridalplasty. I have to confess I watched two full episodes. It’s brides competing, and the winner gets drastic plastic surgery. I couldn’t believe it. That was one of those things that is totally salacious, and I watched it fascinated and kind of in shock.

What song are you listening to on repeat?

I’ve been doing a little bit of a throwback with Blaze Foley, an old country singer. The song is “If I Could Only Fly.” It’s really sad but beautiful.

Interview from Fashiondesain